Career and Technical Education Standards

Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in the U.S. change constantly to provide students with the knowledge and skills they need to thrive in an increasingly dynamic world. But this means that CTE standards continue to change and grow as well.

The Common Career Technical Core (CCTC) includes 16 Career Clusters that define what students should comprehend upon completion of a specific Career Pathway. CCTC was introduced in 2012 as a way to simplify standards, but a great deal of variability still remains from state to state.

Many states have their own unique perspective on education. Eleven states have adopted CCTC, but incorporate their own independent standards. For example, Michigan, Georgia, Colorado, and Florida added a 17th career cluster of Energy, but opted to create standards individualized for each particular state. According to careertech.org other states use CCTC as a conceptual framework for organizing and communicating their existing CTE standards instead of as practical standards.

And standards continue to change. Over ten states have adjusted their standards within the past calendar year alone, at a pace that makes it daunting to keep up with new modifications. Indiana released new standards for their Family and Consumer Sciences career cluster, and South Dakota introduced new legislation affecting five of its career clusters, all just in the past week.

EdGate understands that keeping up with the changes in CTE/CCTC standards for all 50 states is an arduous task for any educator or business.

To that end, we use a blend of technology and dedicated personnel to comb through each repository, identify changes as they happen, and add them to our database, saving you time, energy and money.

We possess over 2.7 million CTE standards in our directory, and that number is growing daily.

Contact us to learn how we can help you align your content to the changing demands of educational communities around the U.S. It's a lot easier than counting to 2.7 million all by yourself.

By: Amanda Dragon

 

Article Tags: